Talk:Parenting after Separation

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Reshuffled placement of DOJ parenting plan resources[edit]

It was great to have Justin's suggestions for this piece, so what I have done to keep the book as short as possible (it being already almost 700 pages) and to preserve the focus on parenting after separation and parenting plans (rather than also child protection, child support, or grandparents resources) is break off some of the less related resources and suggest them to the editors of child support, child protection and grandparent resources sections: I also suggest we place the resource links under "Recommended reading for parents" rather than in the section on "Programs and agencies", given that the DOJ website is not a program or an agency (the same way the other resources listed there are) so much as a host of information. Now, because we are just starting out and kick-starting the collaborative process, I've gone ahead and made the changes in my role as a custodial/managing editor. As subject editors get more comfortable, I won't make substantive changes like this, and I would propose these adjustments in this discussion forum. However, I am also aware that it is probably helpful for me to be more hands-on at this early stage so you can see how I make these changes, and get used to the kind of considerations we have made (led by JP) along the way. Ultimately, however, I will always defer to the editors of this section. Please have a look to see what the end result is --Nate Russell (talk) 17:08, 25 June 2013 (PDT)

Parenting plans[edit]

From Justin via Nate Russell (talk) 16:01, 25 June 2013 (PDT) : below is a first draft for editing purposes on the inclusion of info from JP’s blog in the resources section of the Parenting After Separation page. It is my suggestion that this be placed below the Provincial Family Justice Centre info but before the Recommended Reading for Parents. If somebody would like to test this in the Wiki to ensure the links work (ie. in the discussion feed), please do so and advise [That's what I am doing here. The links are good, and I only had to clean up the bullet points --Nate Russell (talk) 16:01, 25 June 2013 (PDT)]. Of course, edit away at this suggested edit as well! Thank you.

The federal Department of Justice website has a number of high-quality resources that may be helpful. It has a Family Law section in which you'll find a library of department publications and a wide variety of research papers about parenting after separation, the costs of high-conflict separation, and other topics relating to a child's well-being and outcomes following separation. These papers are of a uniformly high quality and are well worth the read. In the Family Law section, there is a link to the [http://canada.justice.gc.ca/eng/fl-df/parent/index.html Custody and Parenting page which links to four sub-categories of information. These are:

There is a child support calculator located in the Family Law section. The federal Department of Justice backgrounder says that a PDF version of the resources listed above will be available soon.

Test with Justin[edit]

NB: Nate and Justin are testing how and where to place this update regarding parenting plans--Nate Russell (talk) 12:57, 19 June 2013 (PDT)

The Department of Justice has continued to expand its excellent Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative with three important new public legal education resources designed to help separating parents create parenting plans for their children.

If you go to the Family Law page on the Department's nicely redesigned website and click on the "Custody and Parenting" link you'll see four main subjects: Create a parenting plan Protect your children Help your kids cope Information for grandparents Clicking on the "Create a parenting plan" link will take you to a new page with links to the three new resources, Making Parenting Plans, a Parenting Plan Checklist and a Parenting Plan Tool. The Department's backgrounder says this about the first and third resources: "Making Plans gives parents information about what issues they need to address when coming up with a parenting arrangement after divorce (ex. schedule for time with children), as well as the processes that they can use to come up with this arrangement (ex. mediation, negotiation). This product promotes agreements between parents by emphasizing the importance of good communication, reducing conflict, and building a co-parenting relationship that focuses on the best interests of children. "The Parenting Plan Tool is a companion product to Making Plans. It is a practical guide to help parents develop a parenting plan. The Parenting Plan Tool contains sample clauses that parents can use as a starting point in developing their parenting plan." These resources all give good, practical advice about planning for the care of children after separation and are well worth reading. The Department's backgrounder says that a PDF version of the resources will be available soon; that may be easier to use than the web-based version which breaks the resources into individual pages that can be somewhat difficult to browse through.

Another very useful feature of the Family Law page is the Child Support Calculator. You can't go wrong when you get your calculations from the horse's mouth.

New sample parenting plans from DOJ[edit]

JP's blog from June 11 brings to light new resources from the Department of Justice's website dealing with parenting plans. They appears to be a checklist and even a recommended sample precedent (that starts here). The sample is awkwardly split up over a couple of webpages that you have to click "Next Page" to keep on reading. This information would be a good candidate to copy and paste into a single, downloadable PDF of Word Doc. The Canadian government expressly allows this provided on the following terms:

Users are required to:

Exercise due diligence in ensuring the accuracy of the materials reproduced; Indicate both the complete title of the materials reproduced, as well as the author organization; and

Indicate that the reproduction is a copy of an official work that is published by the Government of Canada and that the reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada.

--Nate Russell (talk) 10:44, 12 June 2013 (PDT)


Thanks, Nate - I think we need to update the page as outlined in JP's Blog. I will email Justin and Ron and hopefully between the three of us, we can edit the page. If we need help, we'll let you know. Note: by edit page, I suspect that means Justin will edit....M--Mary Mouat (talk) 10:50, 12 June 2013 (PDT)
Excellent, Mary Mouat. Note how for me to respond to your comment now, all I do is add two colon marks to indent it that much more. If you look at this comment in Edit mode you will also see that I left a link to your username by bracketing it with a pair of square brackets.--Nate Russell (talk) 11:17, 12 June 2013 (PDT)
Hopefully this works--Mary Mouat (talk) 14:06, 12 June 2013 (PDT)

This page needs a refresher[edit]

I haven't really reviewed this page in several years. But in rereading it now, it needs a bit of a refresher. I'm not suggesting major changes, but it should be read critically for content, flow and tone and edited as necessary. -- 18:15, May 19, 2013‎ Jpboyd

Money paid by one parent or guardian to another parent or guardian as a contribution toward the cost of a child's living and other expenses.

In law, a particular court or level of court, sometimes used in reference to the court's jurisdiction over a particular issue.

(1) A preliminary version of a document, (2) an order prepared following judgment and submitted to the court for its approval, or (3) to prepare, or draw, a legal document.

In family law, the decision of one or both parties to terminate a married or unmarried relationship; the act of one person leaving the family home to live somewhere else with the intention of terminating the relationship. There is no such thing as a "legal separation." In general, one separates by simply moving out, however, it is possible to be separated but still live under the same roof. See "divorce, grounds of."

In law, a calculation of the allowable legal expenses of a party to a court proceeding, as determined by the Supreme Court Family Rules. The party who is most successful in a court proceeding is usually awarded their "costs" of the proceeding. See "account," "bill of costs," "certificate of costs" and "lawyer's fees."

A person who is younger than the legal age of majority, 19 in British Columbia. See "age of majority."

The legal termination of a valid marriage by an order of a judge; the ending of a marital relationship and the conjugal obligations of each spouse to the other. See "conjugal rights," "marriage" and "marriage, validity of."

A dispute resolution process in which a specially-trained neutral person facilitates discussions between the parties to a legal dispute and helps them reach a compromise settling the dispute. See "alternative dispute resolution" and "family law mediator."

In family law, the process by which an agreement is formed between the parties to a legal dispute resolving that dispute, usually requiring mutual compromise from the parties' original positions to the extent tolerable by each party. See "alternative dispute resolution" and "family law agreements."

(1) A historical decision of the courts, or (2) the principle that such historic decisions of the court are binding on subsequent judges hearing cases of a similar nature or with similar circumstances. (3) The term may also refer to templates or sample documents used to draft new documents. See "common law."

In law, a document demonstrating ownership of a thing. See "ownership."

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