How Do I Address the Judge?

From Clicklaw Wikibooks

How you address the judgeA person appointed by the federal or provincial governments to manage and decide court proceedings in an impartial manner, independent of influence by the parties, the government or agents of the government. The decisions of a judge are binding upon the parties to the proceeding, and are subject to appeal. depends on which court you are in. Each court has a particular honorific that should be used when addressing the judge, and the judge is properly addressed by that honorific, not as "sir," "ma'am," or something else.

Judges of the Court of AppealThe highest level of court in this province, having the jurisdiction to review decisions of the Supreme Court, all provincial lower courts and certain tribunals. See "appeal." and Supreme Court are addressed as My Lord, or My Lady, or Your Lordship, or Your Ladyship, depending on the grammatical context.

Masters and registrars of the Supreme Court are addressed as Your Honour. Provincial CourtA court established and staffed by the provincial government, which includes Small Claims Court, Youth Court and Family Court. The Provincial Court is the lowest level of court in British Columbia and is restricted in the sorts of matters it can deal with. Small Claims Court, for example, cannot deal with claims larger than $25,000, and Family Court cannot deal with the division of family property or matters under the ''Divorce Act''. See "judge" and "jurisdiction." judges are also called Your Honour.

It used to be the case that justices of the peace were properly referred to as Your Worship, but this practice is fading somewhat, and it is now acceptable to refer to them as Your Honour.

You can find information about what to expect in court in How Do I Conduct Myself in Court at an Application? You can find information about court processes in the chapter Resolving Your Legal Problem in Court.

Creativecommonssmall.png JP Boyd on Family Law © John-Paul Boyd and Courthouse Libraries BC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Canada Licence.
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Site
Tools
Contributors
Print/export