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<blockquote><blockquote><tt>(c) the degree to which the spouses relied on the terms of the agreement.</tt></blockquote></blockquote>
 
<blockquote><blockquote><tt>(c) the degree to which the spouses relied on the terms of the agreement.</tt></blockquote></blockquote>
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In 2013 case from the Supreme Court of British Columbia, [https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcsc/doc/2013/2013bcsc983/2013bcsc983.html?resultIndex=1 ''L.G.'' v. ''R.G.''], the Court said that the term "significant unfairness" is intended to create greater certainty by limiting when the Court will intervent to situations which are "unjust or unreasonable".  In a 2014 case of the same Court, [https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcsc/doc/2014/2014bcsc1552/2014bcsc1552.html?resultIndex=1 ''Remmem'' v. ''Remmem''], the Court said that in order for there to be "significant unfairness", the unfairness must be compelling or meaningful having regard to the factors set out in the legislation.   
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In 2013 case from the Supreme Court of British Columbia, [https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcsc/doc/2013/2013bcsc983/2013bcsc983.html?resultIndex=1 ''L.G.'' v. ''R.G.''], the Court said that the term "significant unfairness" is intended to create greater certainty by limiting when the Court will intervene to situations which are "unjust or unreasonable".  In a 2014 case, [https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcsc/doc/2014/2014bcsc1552/2014bcsc1552.html?resultIndex=1 ''Remmem'' v. ''Remmem''], the Supreme Court of British Columbia said that in order for there to be "significant unfairness", the unfairness must be compelling or meaningful having regard to the factors set out in the legislation.   
 
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