Family LawLINE

From Clicklaw Wikibooks
Family LawLINE is a service provided by the Legal Services Society. Family LawLINE lawyers give free legal advice over the phone to people with low incomes who are experiencing family law issues, providing brief "next step" advice about family law issues such as parenting time or contact/access, guardianship/custody, child and spousal support, property division, family agreements, adoption, and court procedures.

Hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays: 9:00 am to 3:00 pm. Wednesdays: 9:00 am to 2:30 pm

Website familylaw.lss.bc.ca
Phone 604-408-2172
Toll-free: 1-866-577-2525
Find on Clicklaw Family LawLINE on Clicklaw HelpMap

A term under the Family Law Act which describes the time a guardian has with a child and during which is responsible for the day to day care of the child. See "guardian."

A term under the Family Law Act that describes the visitation rights of a person who is not a guardian with a child. Contact may be provided by court order or by the agreement among the child's guardians who have parental responsibility for determining contact. See "guardian" and "parental responsibilities."

Under the Divorce Act, the schedule of a parent's time with their children under an order or agreement. Access usually refers to the schedule of the parent with the least time with the child. See "custody."

In family law, an antiquated term used by the Divorce Act to describe the right to possess a child and make parenting decisions concerning the child's health, welfare and upbringing. See "access."

Money paid by one spouse to another spouse either as a contribution toward the spouse's living expenses or to compensate the spouse for the economic consequences of decisions made by the spouses during their relationship.

Something which can be owned. See "chattels" and "real property."

In family law, the act or process of taking another person's child as one's own. The child becomes the adopting parent's legal child as if the child were the adopting parent's natural child, while the natural parent loses all rights and obligations with respect to the child. See "natural parent."

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