Difference between revisions of "I Bought a Product from a Door-to-Door Salesperson and No Longer Want It"

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== What happens next ==
 
== What happens next ==
The supplier has '''15 days''' to return your money once you have notified him or her of your wish to cancel the sale. If you do not receive the funds within that period of time, complain to Consumer Protection BC. <nowiki>[</nowiki>see #14-Consumer Protection BC in Part 2 of this Guide for contact and website information.<nowiki>]</nowiki>
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The supplier has '''15 days''' to return your money once you have notified him or her of your wish to cancel the sale. If you do not receive the funds within that period of time, complain to Consumer Protection BC. <nowiki>[</nowiki>see [[Consumer Protection BC]] in Part 2 of this Guide for contact and website information.<nowiki>]</nowiki>
  
 
== Where to get help ==
 
== Where to get help ==
See Part 2- Resources, starting on page 43, for a list of helpful resources. Your best bets are:
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See the [[Resource Guide]] in Part 2 for a list of helpful resources. Your best bets are:
 
* [[Consumer Protection BC]].
 
* [[Consumer Protection BC]].
 
* [[Access Justice]], [[Lawyer Referral Service]], [[Salvation Army Pro Bono Lawyer Consultation Program]], [[Private Bar Lawyers]].
 
* [[Access Justice]], [[Lawyer Referral Service]], [[Salvation Army Pro Bono Lawyer Consultation Program]], [[Private Bar Lawyers]].
* Legal Services Society Publications: “Consumer Law and Credit/Debt Law”.
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* [[Legal Services Society]] Publications: “Consumer Law and Credit/Debt Law”.
 
* [[Law Students’ Legal Advice Program]]. (See “Chapter 9-Consumer Protection”, for useful information on “Direct Sales”.)
 
* [[Law Students’ Legal Advice Program]]. (See “Chapter 9-Consumer Protection”, for useful information on “Direct Sales”.)
  

Revision as of 00:01, 30 April 2010

When a person comes to your home and sells you goods or services, this is called a Direct Sale. You generally have 10 days to cancel a direct sale if you decide you don’t want the product, regardless of what it says in the paperwork the seller gives you. If you don’t get a copy of the contract of sale or the product itself right away, this period may be longer.

First Steps[edit]

  1. As soon as you decide you don’t want the product you bought from a door-to-door salesperson, cancel the sale by delivering, mailing, emailing or faxing the supplier (the person that the salesperson was working for), informing them of your intention to cancel the contract. Ensure that the supplier receives the notice in time (usually within 10 days after you receive a copy of the contract), and keep a copy of what you send them and a record of the date and method you sent it.
  2. Call the supplier to ensure that they will return your money and take back the product. You may be responsible for shipping costs to return the product to the supplier.

What happens next[edit]

The supplier has 15 days to return your money once you have notified him or her of your wish to cancel the sale. If you do not receive the funds within that period of time, complain to Consumer Protection BC. [see Consumer Protection BC in Part 2 of this Guide for contact and website information.]

Where to get help[edit]

See the Resource Guide in Part 2 for a list of helpful resources. Your best bets are:


Before meeting with a lawyer or advocate, complete the form Preparing for Your Interview in Part 3 of this Guide. Make sure you bring copies of all documents relating to your case.